An emailed business letter should also be composed in a common font. Don’t use script or colors other than black and white in a business email.
Choose the right kind of paper. The letter should be printed on 8.5” by 11” (known as “letter size”). If you are outside the U.S., you might use size A4 paper. Some lengthy contracts may be printed on 8.5” x 14” (“legal size”).



If you’re printing the letter to send, consider printing the letter on company letterhead. This formal letter format lends it a more professional air and provides your company’s logo and contact information.

Include information about your company. List your company name and the company address, with each part of the address written on a different line. If you’re self-employed or an independent contractor, add your name either in place of the company name or above it.


If your company has pre-designed letterhead, you can use this instead of typing out your company and address.
If you’re typing out the address, it should appear either right or left justified at the top of the page, depending on you and your company’s preference.
If you’re sending the letter to an international location, type out the country in capital letters.


Add the recipient’s information. Write Business Letter Example out the recipient’s full name, title (if applicable), company name, and address in that order, with each piece of information on a separate line. If necessary, include a reference number. The recipient’s information should be left justified a few lines below the date.


It is best to address the letter to a specific person. This way, an actual person will be able to respond to your letter. If you don’t know the name of the person to whom you should send the letter, do a bit of research.
Choose a salutation. The salutation is an important indicator of respect, and which one you use will depend on whether you know the person to whom you’re writing, how well you know them and the level of formality in your relationship.5 Consider the following options:
• Employ “To Whom It May Concern” only if you don’t know whom, specifically, you’re addressing.


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